It’s Hard Being Male

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credit: keenetrial.com

We live in strange times. Never has maleness been more difficult, less socially acceptable, and more dangerous to one’s health, wellbeing, career, and liberty. A once-proud gender, a bit under 50% of humanity, has been, through the miracle of gender fluidity, the invention of new pronouns, legislation, public opinion and politics, reduced to uncertain pariah status, at least on the coasts, on college campuses and now in the halls of Congress.

Men have always comprised, by definition, the evil patriarchy, a club, cult, fraternity–write your preferred negative label here–merely by being born with a penis, but even that kind of biological membership by erection is now in doubt. Yet men still bear the blame, not only for being male, but for virtually every societal pathology.

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The Freddie Gray Case, Update 52: Rice Acquitted–Again

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courtesy of: ackbarsays

Lt. Brian Rice, cleared of all criminal charges on July 18, 2016, has again been cleared, this time of a ridiculous number of departmental charges, but before discussing that process, let us, gentle readers, review the state of policing–and community safety–in Baltimore, circa November, 2017: Continue reading

AR-15 Culture

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There are those that claim Flyover Country America, awash with toxic masculinity, is in the grip of an evil gun culture. It is an issue I’ve repeatedly addressed, here and here.  In the first of those articles, I ended:

Gun culture? Hardly. The term is useful not in defining anyone or any coherent philosophy, but in slandering those that believe in individual liberty and personal responsibility. Words do matter. Perhaps it’s time to take some of them back. We begin by challenging–each and every time–the mere premise of ‘gun culture,’ ‘common sense’ gun regulation, ‘assault weapons,’ and similarly weakly definable attempts to seize the rhetorical initiative.

In their place, exalt liberty, which has the very great advantage of being what is embodied in the Constitution. Let our opponents explain why they want to take away liberty and substitute their failed ideas. Put them on the defensive for a change.

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Brilliant Choices

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This is rather like giving Yasser Arafat (1994), Jimmy Carter (2002), Al Gore (2007) or Barack Obama (2009) the Nobel Peace Prize…


It’s a good thing Kaepernick doesn’t have to wear a helmet these days…

Al Franken: Leading The War On Women

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Having grown up in South Dakota, not far from Minnesota, I thought Minnesotans hardy, rational people–and then they held a fraudulent election and sent Al Franked to the Senate. Not funny. Since then, Franken has shown himself to be one of the least funny people in America, and easily one of the most hypocritical and corruptly, insanely partisan. The mere idea of Franken as a U.S. Senator is like the end of Animal House, where a montage of character’s futures revealed Bluto as Senator John Blutarsky.

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Sutherland Springs: Two Progressive Imperatives

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Lawmakers’ thoughts, prayers aren’t good enough.  For ordinary citizens in the wake of another mass shooting, such responses are touching gestures. But lawmakers have the power to act.

Thus begins an opinion article by the editorial board of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

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California: The Risks Of Liberty–UPDATED

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California Attack: Initial Thoughts Updated 

We are beginning to learn more about the gunman, who would surely want his name to be mentioned here. The toll of dead currently stands at five, wounded–including children–at ten. Consider this from Fox News:

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Students: Deeply Feeling Isms

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For some time, I have been troubled. I’m sure some readers would attest my writings reveal ample evidence of that, but I speak of my students, of the current generation of teenagers. I’ve thought long and hard. Am I merely engaging in the all too common comfort of thinking those that lived the good old days more responsible, intelligent, moral and capable than the current generation?

I’ve much more thinking to do, more observations to make before writing on the subject, but in the meantime, let us consider the observations of Adam MacLeod, published in The New Boston Post:

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