The Danger Of Swords

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credit: bearingarms.com

credit: bearingarms.com

I’ve always been fascinated by swords. I couldn’t get enough of “Zorro” as a child, and that inevitably led me to studying European fencing, and eventually, Japanese fencing and sword drawing (Kendo and Iaido). In fact, I was the co-founder and first vice president of the Wyoming division of the United States Fencing Association. I have a middling large collection of replica swords from all eras, and use them in teaching the Aurthurian legends. The kids really enjoy being able to handle and wield the swords—under carefully controlled circumstances—and they look and feel just like live blades though all are dulled. It enables them to understand the reality of men at arms of earlier ages in a way that merely reading about them, or watching Hollywood versions of reality, cannot.

So I was interested, and appalled, by a recently article where two police officers failed to recognize the danger represented by a katana-wielding man who was able to seriously injure one officer before being shot and killed by the other. The result was The Deadly Danger of Swords at The Truth About Guns.

One of the reasons I enjoy doing a weekly article there, apart from the fact that TTAG is the top gun blog on the Internet, is that readers are enthusiastic commenters. They’re not always careful readers and sometimes miss the context—as some do with this article—but it’s always interesting and entertaining.

Stop by if you have a few minutes, and as always, your comments—there and here—are very much appreciated.

The Walter Scott Case, Update 2: Tempest In A Teapot?

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Scott RunsIn the first article of this series—The Walter Scott Case: Initial Impressions  I expressed concern over how quickly Officer Slager was not only fired, but arrested and charged with murder. I have seen nothing since to alleviate that concern.

All investigators understand that it is extraordinarily unwise to rush to make arrests in most cases. If any case is being assigned to an investigator, the opportunity to make an on-the-spot arrest has already passed, and unless the suspect is so dangerous it is necessary to immediately arrest them to protect the public, diligence and patience, rather than haste, are the order of the day. Even in those cases, there is virtually always a manhunt in progress even as the investigator begins to work.

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Get Me A Bigger Projectile

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photos credit: nydailynews

photos credit: nydailynews

In February of 2015 a Marana, Arizona police officer ran into a man with his patrol car. Excessive force, as the man’s attorney claims, or a reasonable alternative to firearms? The NY Daily News has the story:

A former NYPD officer who calls himself Robocop used his police cruiser to ram a rifle-toting suspect on a one-man crime spree, dramatic Arizona police video released Tuesday shows.

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Obama And Cuba: The “I” Has It

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credit: blogs.reuters.com

credit: blogs.reuters.com

In unilaterally making nice with Cuba. President Obama has often, an dismissively said “the Cold War is over.” And so it is, however, American policy has never been based on the existence of the Cold War, but on America’s national interests. Of course, Mr. Obama reflexively speaks of such things as they affect him. Consider these excerpts from his December 17, 2015 policy speech on Cuba at the White House: 

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Obsolescence

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Watch 1This is a Casio W-98W digital watch. It costs from $15.00 to $22.00 dollars depending on where it is purchased. It tells the time–in 12 hour or 24-hour modes, the day and the date, and among other things, serves as a stopwatch, and an alarm clock. In other words, it is an inexpensive and entirely functional example of the contemporary digital watchmaker’s art.

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Can The Secret Service Be Fixed 4?

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Inauguration Parade: Beginning Of The Decline? credit: US Secret Service

Inauguration Parade: Beginning Of The Decline?
credit: US Secret Service

Throughout my 61 years, during all my years of police work, I took for granted that the United States Secret Service was among the most professional, competent agencies in the world, and until the age of Obama, I could reasonably believe that to be true. The agents I met and worked with, men and women on the vice presidential and presidential details, were sharp and focused. But just as Barack Obama has degraded and politicized virtually every governmental agency, his destructive influence is rampant in the Secret Service as well. My prior articles on this apparently never-ending debacle:

Can The Secret Service Be Fixed? 

Can The Secret Service Be Fixed 2? 

Can The Secret Service Be Fixed 3? 

In the third article of that series I wrote:

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Requiem For A Father

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Dad, my Sister and Me

Dad, my Sister and Me

My father, B.G. McDaniel, died this morning. He was of The Greatest Generation, one of those who fought for western civilization, and after WWII, worked to build it. He was one of millions that made America America. They left a magnificent legacy. We’re not doing so well with it these days.

There are a variety of figures for the average American male lifespan. For my father, the average was probably the low 70s. When he died at 95, he’d beaten those odds by more than 20 years. He spent the last year of his life in a nursing home, and he died quickly and without suffering. He was not broken down by disease and wracked with pain. After breakfast, which he didn’t feel like eating, he lay down, and within  minutes, was gone.

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School Attacks: Proper Planning UPDATED

credit: en.wikipedia.org

credit: en.wikipedia.org

UPDATE: I  first posted this article on April 23, 2014.  I’m afraid I’ll be busy this week dealing with a pressing personal matter, so I thought it might be a good idea to repost it.  It’s a topic that is not going away, and one that wee need to keep in the minds of school board and school administrators.

John Matthews is billed by Fox News thus:

John Matthews is the executive director of the Community Safety Institute. He is a 30-year law enforcement veteran, the author of Mass Shootings: Six Steps for Survival , School Safety 101,and the co-author of The Eyeball Killer, a first-hand account of his capture of Dallas’ only serial killer.

His April 17, 2014 article, Fifteen years after Columbine: What we still need to do to protect our kids” is a remarkable compendium of suggestions, which on their face seem reasonable, but in reality, do nothing more than spend money to achieve little or no increase in deterrence and safety. He begins by noting that it has been 15 years since the Columbine attack, an attack he calls “the seminal event in American school shootings.”

The senseless violence at Columbine forced the issue of school safety into the American consciousness, leading to modifications in police practices and a complete overhaul of school safety policies and procedures.

Because of the public hue and cry, law enforcement officials realized that when children are dying, tactical containment is not enough, so Active Shooter response became standard protocol.

In the aftermath of what was then the worst school shooting in American history, an enraged public also forced school administrators to bolster their safety readiness and preparedness efforts. State legislatures throughout the nation established school safety centers and mandated both district and campus safety plans.

Matthews is correct that police procedure has changed, though not everywhere, and there is no national response standard, not that a federal mandate would help in this any more than federal mandates help in any other human endeavor. The primary change in police procedure calls for an immediate attack on any school shooter by the first officers on the scene. In other words, whoever gets there first has to run into the school, hunt down a shooter, and shoot him. Continue reading