A Gun Ownership Primer: Updated Edition

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Walther P22

Walther P22

In the past, I produced a series on the rational for gun ownership. It’s time for an update, and probably, an expansion on that series, and my friend and fellow blogger/editor at Bearing Arms, Bob Owens, has been kind enough to sponsor the series.

The first installment “A Gun Ownership Primer: The Philosophy Of Gun Ownership,” is now up at Bearing Arms. I’ll follow it each week with new installments. The purpose of the series is to explore in some depth the issues relating to gun ownership, including philosophy, politics, firearm types and their advantages and disadvantages, ammunition, the law, and other issues of interest to those considering becoming firearm owners, and to those who have as many guns as they need, but not as many as they’d like.

Stop by if you have a few minutes. I suspect it may be worth your time. And as always, please comment there and here. I really do want to hear from you; it’s the only way I can know if I’m doing more than pleasing myself.

America: The Failure of Resilience? Part 2

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credit: imgkid.com

credit: imgkid.com

In America: The Failure of Resilience? Part 1, I wrote of my worries about the ability of our representative republic to recover, as it always has in the past, from the disasters that have befallen it. Without question, Barack Obama and Democrats are not solely responsible for our current state of affairs. More than enough Republicans have behaved selfishly, fecklessly and irresponsibly for decades. But never has America had a president like Barack Obama. Never has an American president so clearly hated America and Americans, capitalism, democracy, and battered our allies while lauding and supporting our enemies. Never has a president done so much damage so fast that it may be impossible to ever fully reverse it. Never has a president done so much to place his ideological cronies in the permanent federal bureaucracy and on the federal bench that his policies may live after his term in office and so that reversing them may be made potentially impossible.

Honest historians will be asking and answering questions about Barack Obama for decades. In many cases, the answers are obvious and easily found. In others, it may take years of careful investigation to uncover criminally concealed documents and other evidence. And the scandals, oh, the scandals.

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EPA Cockroaches v. Wyoming Welder, Part 2

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wyomingfarmerOn August 24, 2014, I posted an article titled “EPA Cockroaches v. Wyoming Welder,” the story of Wyoming welder Andy Johnson who, owning a modest eight acre ranch, had a dream. Johnson and his wife Katie wanted to build a small stock pond (depicted above–notice his palatial mansion in the background) to stock with fish, water their horses, attract livestock, and serve as an educational resource for their three daughters.

Vicious environmental criminal and scofflaw that he is, Johnson met every requirement of Wyoming authorities for building the stock pond, and has the paperwork to prove it. But that, of course, did not satisfy the imperious bureaucrats at the Obama EPA, who are threatening him with more than $70,000.00 a day in fines if he does not obliterate the pond and do everything else the EPA prefers. This despite the fact that such stock ponds fall under a clear exception in the Clean Water Act. The EPA demands that citizens prove themselves innocent, tries to deny them access to the courts, and in general assumes the mantle of petty tyrant.

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Accomplishments That Changed History: The USS Nautilus

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You’ve heard, I’m sure, of the Nautilus. I don’t mean the version of the Nautilus–creation of Captain Nemo–dreamed up in the 1954 movie 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea,  or even the version o the Nautilus featured in the 2003 movie

The Nautilus from 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea credit: galleryhip.com

The Nautilus from 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea
credit: galleryhip.com

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Though fascinating in their own way,

Nautilus from The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen credit: pinterest

Nautilus from The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
credit: pinterest

even more fascinating was the USS Nautilus. SSN-571, the first nuclear powered submarine, in fact, the first nuclear powered warship, launched January 21, 1954.

USS Nautilus SSN-571 credit: murdoconline

USS Nautilus SSN-571
credit: murdoconline

The Nautilus was, for its time, blazingly fast, achieving 23 knots underwater. Its nuclear power plant made the Nautilus the first true submarine rather than a surface ship that could submerge for short periods. Among its incredible accomplishments was the first under-the-ice transit of the North Pole.

The Atlantic has a fascinating article about the construction and testing of the nuclear reactor, in of all places, Idaho. It is absolutely worth your time.

The Nautilus was decommissioned in 1980 and since 1985 has been on display in Groton, Connecticut, where it was built.

Cousin It In Nebraska

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credit: fggam.org

credit: fggam.org

READER WARNING: In writing about this situation, I will almost certainly fail to use the politically correct, “sensitive,” “diverse,” “inclusive, “equal,” etc., ad nauseum, terms that those demanding an absolute right never to be offended–or mildly discomfited–demand. I intend no offense. Oh hell, actually I do intend to offend such people, if for no reason than that they deserve it. However, since the “people” involved are offended by the words “boy” and “girl,” it appears that mere existence is offensive to them, so I can reasonably assume my existence will be perceived as a grave offense. I’m just too busy living a reasonably useful life to bother to keep up. Fox News has the story:  

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In-Service Training And Brain Damage

More than two years ago–March 20, 2012, to be precise–I wrote an article titled “Education: Fixing Intelligence and In-Service Training.” I chanced upon that article again recently, and it struck home, so I decided to update it.

credit: justsomething.co

credit: justsomething.co

I, gentle readers, am an education seminar survivor. I won’t identify that seminar as such things are a bit of a sore spot for administrators, but suffice it to say it’s all the rage these days in Texas, and while it was not the worst brain cell abuse to which I’ve ever been subjected, it wasn’t far from the bottom, particularly considering I had to drive–both ways–in urban rush hour traffic. I won’t enter a 12-step program. I don’t think they exist, and if they did, because they’re education-related, the cure would surely be worse than the disease.

Too many these days are ready to blame teachers for the sorry state of education. Please keep in mind that overall, public education does surprisingly well at providing educational opportunity for kids. I write about such things because it’s so frustrating. With so little effort, we could do so much better, yet we settle for mediocrity and where teaching teachers is concerned, for insults and disparagement. Read on. I trust you’ll get the point.

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