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I’ve often said D/S/Cs have no idea from where electricity comes. Kamala Harris, soon to be POTUS, explains:

Well, let’s think about it. Today, America has more than half a million miles of transmission lines, enough to wrap around the globe 24 times. These lines connect the power plants, where electricity is created, to homes and businesses and schools and hospitals across our nation.

Think about it: Every time you turn on a light or charge your laptop or plug in your air conditioner or put leftovers in the fridge, you rely on the power delivered by our nation’s network of transmission lines.

Gee Kamala, I had no idea. Thanks!

I’ve previously noted Europe went full, bull goose loony green a decade or more ago, so we’ve had the opportunity to see how that has worked for them: badly on toast.  I usually caution about making direct comparisons between America and other nations, but the laws of physics apply everywhere. Steven Hayward at Powerline explains electricity isn’t free:

Rocketing electricity prices are increasing the cost of driving electric vehicles in Europe, in some cases making them more expensive to run than gas-powered models—a change that could threaten the continent’s electric transition. . .

Coming just as some governments are removing subsidies for EV buyers, this change could slow down EV sales, threaten the region’s greenhouse-gas emission targets, and make it hard for European car makers to recoup the high costs of their electric transition. . .

At the pricing peak, drivers of Tesla’s Model 3, the most efficient all-electric vehicle in the Environment Protection Agency’s fuel guide in the midsize-vehicle category, would pay €18.46 at a Tesla supercharger station in Europe for a charge sufficient to drive 100 miles.

So what?  Electric charging is always cheaper than gas, right?

By comparison, drivers in Germany would pay €18.31 for gasoline to drive the same distance in a Honda Civic 4-door, the equivalent combustion-engine model in the EPA’s ranking.

Oh. Maybe, just this once, we could learn from history—the experience of others—before we’re doomed to repeat it? Speaking of not learning, our Postal Service is going to all electric vehicles, but I’ll save that for a near future article. Let’s see how electrification of city vehicles is going in NYC:

credit: the drive

The [Department of Sanitation] aims to switch all 6,000 vehicles in its fleet from gas to electric as part of the state’s goal to reduce emissions by 2040. But city officials say they haven’t found electric garbage trucks that are powerful enough to plow snow.

The department has ordered seven electric rear loader garbage trucks, custom-made by Mack and costing more than $523,000 each, with delivery slated for the spring. Used for curbside trash collection, the department’s current rear loader truck fleet runs on diesel and is outfitted with plows to clear streets during snow season.

But officials say previous electric trucks tested by sanitation have not lasted longer than four hours plowing snow before running out of power…

Electric trucks sufficiently powerful for the job can be made—at great expense—but the problem is producing the power necessary to do the job gas powered vehicles easily handle drains the batteries at greatly accelerated rates. To do the same job as a single, gas powered truck requires two, and likely three, EVs. This, gentle readers, is one of the primary reasons Nikola Tesla’s AC power won out over DC power in the early days of electrification. Batteries just don’t cut it. Not in NYC, and certainly not in Flyover Country, like Wyoming:

EV charging stations: maybe, someday, kinda, sorta…

Xaviar Steavenson and his sister Alice Steavenson wanted to experience the joy of driving a Tesla cross country.

They rented a Tesla from a Hertz outlet in Orlando, Florida, and headed out on the road to their destination – Wichita, Kansas.

While the Tesla performed well in Florida, Xaviar Steavenson told Cowboy State Daily that things took a turn for the worse when they encountered cold weather. They had to stop six times in one day to charge the vehicle.

‘The last day of our three-day trip, it took about 17 hours to go 452 miles,’ Steavenson said.

At 70 MPH, that distance would normally take a bit less than 6.5 hours.

Coming out of Florida, Steavenson said, the Tesla would give the road trippers 300 miles before they had to charge. But when they encountered the cold weather farther north, their range was reduced to about 100 miles, according to the estimation the car provides.

‘It would get down to 5% to 20% charge as we drove between towns,’ Steavenson said.

Take the link, gentle readers, where you’ll find several EV cheerleaders trying to make all manner of excuses for the rental Tesla’s abysmal, and dangerous—people die in the cold when there’s no electricity—lack of performance. Long charging times and horrible range isn’t the only EV problem in Wyoming:

The federal government is providing about $24 million to the state of Wyoming to build electric vehicle (EV) charging stations along Wyoming’s three interstates.

Jesse Kirchmeier, special projects officer with the Wyoming Department of Transportation, said that if the state’s traffic projections are correct, stations built with the money won’t likely be self-sustaining for at least 20 years.

Wyoming officials thought EV charging stations might be a boost to tourism. Alas, the feds aren’t being helpful.

The Federal Highway Administration has yet to issue final rules about requirements for the National Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program, and WYDOT won’t be able to issue requests for proposals (RFPs) to determine how much interest the state will get from private companies wanting to build charging stations with the money.

According to the initial guidance from the administration, the stations need to have four 150-kilowatt charging ports at each station, which have to be placed every 50 miles and within a mile of the interstate.

In rural areas like Wyoming, that’s a lot of energy to deliver to a place with no existing infrastructure.

As I’ve noted in past articles, the feds won’t authorize the station locations Wyoming’s terrain demands. The article also points out the problems with running all that juice to the middle of nowhere, and the certainty the stations, which must be privately owned and maintained, won’t be anything close to profitable.

In August of 2022, I wrote Dodge: Get Woke; Go Broke, which was about Dodge’s announcement they would soon produce only electrically powered Chargers and Challengers, their muscle car models. It’s an article about how a major manufacturer can utterly fail to understand why people buy their muscle cars. One example was Dodge refuses to tell anyone the range of these wonder cars, which means even by EV standards, it’s bad. Again, EVs can produce that kind of sprint horsepower, but it drains batteries at warp speed. Now, Harley Davidson is falling for the same green lunacy:

credit: harley davidson

As the celebration of its 120th anniversary kicks off, Harley-Davidson knows it needs to evolve in order to survive.

The storied American motorcycle maker may have spun off the battery-powered Livewire as its own separate brand, but that doesn’t mean the brand isn’t fully committed to electrification. In fact, its CEO, Jochen Zeitz, says that company will eventually only make electric bikes.

‘At some point in time, Harley Davidson will be all-electric,’ the executive recently told Dezeen. ‘But that’s a long-term transition that needs to happen. It’s not something you do overnight.’

Talk about failing to understand one’s customer base! While Harleys have become far more reliable over the years, Japanese bikes are generally cheaper, more technologically advanced, and better values. People buy Harleys to hear the rumble and feel the vibration of those big V-twin engines, that and because of traditional Harley styling, the mere appearance of the V-twin being a big part of that styling. Harley riders would surely consider this an unforgivable betrayal. “What the f**k?!” is likely to be one of their milder exclamations.  Should Harley go full stupid, Indian is going to have most of their business.

Our big three auto manufacturers are also making noises about nothing but EV lineups in the near future. As I’ve often pointed out, that’s going to be physically impossible. There just aren’t enough of the necessary rare earth and other elements available, to say nothing of insufficient electric power for charging. No one is planning, or building, nearly enough electric plants to keep up with that kind of demand, particularly when greenies demand nothing but wind and solar power, which even the dimmest among them—there’s a great deal of competition for that honor—must know can’t possibly meet our current power needs, to say nothing of a country with nothing but EVs. Unlike GM, Ford and Dodge, Toyota continues to live in the real world:

Toyota Motor Corporation president Akio Toyoda has long been a skeptic of the frenzied embrace of Electric Vehicles by the automotive industry. Indeed, two years ago we wroteabout Toyoda’s concerns that it was unrealistic to expect the entire industry to electrify in the timeframe that governments and activists (but we repeat ourselves) have demanded, not least because of the cost of updating infrastructure—in Japan alone he estimated that it would cost somewhere between $135 billion to $358 billion to build up the required infrastructure to support an fully EV fleet.

And then there’s the fact that switching to EVs doesn’t change how electricity is generated. As Toyoda said at the time, ‘most of the country’s electricity is generated by burning coal and natural gas, anyway.’ So the politicians mandating a change are ensuring that, ultimately, our vehicles will all be coal powered. Consequently, according to Toyoda, ‘The more EVs we build, the worse carbon dioxide gets.’

Speaking to reporters in Thailand just recently, Toyoda made clear that his doubts haven’t subsided. What was really notable, however, was his claim that he’s not alone among industry big-wigs. Indeed, he stated that a ‘silent majority’ are exactly where he is. From the Wall Street Journal:

‘Toyota Motor Corporation president Akio Toyoda has long been a skeptic of the frenzied embrace of Electric Vehicles by the automotive industry. Indeed, two years ago we wrote about Toyoda’s concerns that it was unrealistic to expect the entire industry to electrify in the timeframe that governments and activists (but we repeat ourselves) have demanded, not least because of the cost of updating infrastructure—in Japan alone he estimated that it would cost somewhere between $135 billion to $358 billion to build up the required infrastructure to support an fully EV fleet.’

And then there’s the fact that switching to EVs doesn’t change how electricity is generated. As Toyoda said at the time, ‘most of the country’s electricity is generated by burning coal and natural gas, anyway.’ So the politicians mandating a change are ensuring that, ultimately, our vehicles will all be coal powered. Consequently, according to Toyoda, ‘The more EVs we build, the worse carbon dioxide gets.’

President Akio Toyoda said he is among the auto industry’s silent majority in questioning whether electric vehicles should be pursued exclusively, comments that reflect a growing uneasiness about how quickly car companies can transition…. [Said Toyoda,] ‘That silent majority is wondering whether EVs are really OK to have as a single option. But they think it’s the trend so they can’t speak out loudly.’

Perhaps he describes this as a ‘trend’ because he can’t bring himself to say ‘mania,’ but it is clear that that is what he means.

While I’ve always appreciated Toyota’s engineering, I’ve stuck with American made vehicles out of a sense of patriotism and economic self interest. If greenies get their way, I, and millions of other Americans, will be reevaluating that thought.

A power plant in Arizona, supplying the power CA won’t build. No, that’s not pollution, it’s condensation–cold day.
credit: a faithful reader

Final Thoughts: Certainly, the Biden Meat Puppet Administration, run by green fanatics, is pressuring the automobile industry to kiss their electric behinds. Perhaps this is just the industry’s way of appearing to be on board. They know the economic and natural resource reality of trying to go all electric, or even to produce marginally more EVs than they do today. They know what they’re cheerleading is physically, practically, impossible.

Sadly, that doesn’t mean we won’t waste trillions, and damage our economy and national security in the pursuit of electric phantoms. But then again, our self-imagined betters want us to eat bugs, own nothing, and love it, so…