Screen Shot 2016-08-16 at 12.26.54Don’t the French have enough trouble these days? 

A Tesla Model S spontaneously burst into flames in Monday while on a test drive in France, according to French media reports.

The car was being driven by a couple and a representative of Tesla as part of an event hosted by the California electric carmaker. The Model S sedan was cruising on the boulevard d’Aritxague in Bayonne in the southwest of France when the incident occurred.

The driver of the car told French media outlet Sud Ouest that after a little acceleration there was a warning noise in the car, at which point the Tesla host told the driver to pull over so she could call Tesla about the issue before continuing the test drive.

The trio then saw white smoke, and exited the vehicle. The driver, identified only as Nicolas, said the car was engulfed in flames in less than a minute and totally destroyed within five minutes. No one was injured.

Gee, I wonder if this inspired the couple to buy a Tesla? Perhaps they were hot for the car? Or they had a burning desire to buy one? Most likely, their passion for that particular EV went up in smoke with the Model S.

That was rather a pricey fire, too. According to Edmunds.com, the average price of a Tesla Model S these days is $98,700. If I bought one, I’d have to live in it.

A former Tesla...

A former Tesla…

Back in January of 2016 I posted Electric Vehicles: Hunka, Hunka Burnin’ EV—Whoo!  That article also spoke about the spontaneous combustion of a Model S. I ended thus:

Full Disclaimer in the hope of heading off outraged and obscene responses from EV owners and enthusiasts:

As I have maintained since my first article on EVs, if you desire an EV and have the money for one, by all means, buy it. Buy one for every day of the week and change them like underwear if that pleases you, and I wish you good fortune and happiness with your choices–in cars and undies. That’s one of the great things about America.  The fact that most of us wear clean undies is pretty great if you think about it.

However, don’t think to use your preference and your ability to afford an EV as a bludgeon with which to beat everyone else into submission and acceptance of your choices and preferences. The problem with EVs is, and will continue to be, they cost far too much and they don’t have the range and flexibility necessary for most Americans. Greenies and bureaucrats surely see EVs, and forcing people to buy them, as an essential part of their power base, but reality continues to intrude. The laws of physics continue to remain a frustrating barrier.

I also do not suggest that your EV is inevitably going to burst into flames in your driveway or garage. That remains relatively rare. However, it is possible, and something the rational person thinking of buying an EV might want to consider.

Perhaps the most significant indicator remains Mr. Obama himself, who, lo those many years ago, promised to buy a Chevy Volt when he left office. I wouldn’t be holding my breath on that one. Buying a Volt, I mean. He’ll probably leave office. Probably.

In the meantime, I continue to notice far less pro-electric vehicle propaganda in the media than during the early years of the Age of Obama. Living in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metroplex, which is a near-perfect environment for EVs, I continue to see very few of them, despite traveling a considerable number of miles each week on the major highways of that area. How few? I’ve seen one new Chevy Volt in the last six months.

It’s those darned laws of physics again preventing the dawn of that bold, bright EV future that will be instrumental in saving the planet. That and economics. Oh, and EVs spontaneously bursting into flame.  Whoo too!

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